7 Important Safety Tips To Consider When Running Outside

 

You can sit at home, do nothing, and it's safe. However, this is not what our bodies are born for. We are asked to move, to be active, to exercise, and for millions of people, this includes running. Unfortunately, this can be dangerous if you don't pay attention to various security tools and policies. They say that when you bet on security, you are betting on your life. Running offers a lot of health and mental benefits, but it doesn't make any sense if you get hurt on the road. You can help make sure you get home safely by following the following 10 safety tips for runners.

#1. Wear reflective clothes or accessories, especially when running before dawn or after dark.


Your goal is to let others see you. There are some reflective products you can buy and stick on your clothes. If that's not enough, you can also wear a reflective vest. Another good idea is to carry a small lamp or wear a headlamp. Just make sure the traffic light is white, because the driver may interpret the flashing red light as a sign of danger ahead. Drivers may be more tired or absent-minded than usual in the early morning or evening. Even during the day, your clothes should be brightly visible.

#2. Don't wear headphones.


Loud music or sound may be good for your attention, but they can obscure important aspects around you, such as car horns, sirens, or imminent attacks. If you have to listen to music, try using only one headset, or put headphones around your neck and lower the volume. Always pay attention to your surroundings. Mind-wandering runners are easy targets.

#3. If you are on the road, drive in the opposite direction, so you can see the oncoming car.


Unfortunately, traffic-related accidents are common to runners. When running on the road, assume that the driver can't see you and adjust your behavior accordingly. This may mean that even if you have the right of way, you can briefly switch to the sidewalk or stop at the intersection. First of all, seeing the car will give you a hint as to whether you need to get out of the way or provide some signals that you are present. For example, hills and curves may be a problem because the driver's eyesight may be temporarily affected by sunlight. Pay special attention to parking lots, bars or places with heavy traffic. You can also use gestures to express your intentions to avoid confusion.

#4. Have a cell phone at all times.


Many runners like to be as light as possible, so they don't like to carry cell phones or any other luggage. However, you can buy a lot of things to make your phone easier, such as holding your phone's armband. In addition to giving you a way to call for help, others can also use your cell phone as proof of identity. It will allow people to contact your emergency contact in the event of an accident or injury.

#5. Rely on your instincts.


Sometimes you will feel a feeling of vomiting in your stomach, or a tingling sensation in the hair behind your next wish. Don't ignore these feelings. They are the way your brain tells you what's wrong, so it's important to listen. Quickly remove yourself from the area or environment. If someone looks suspicious to you, trust your instincts, cross the road or change direction. Even if you think it's stupid, remember, it's better to make a mistake 10 times than to do the right thing once and not follow your instincts.

#6. Don't go it alone.


Whenever possible, run with one or more partners. The reason is simple: it is harder for two people to dominate than one. In addition, if something happens, such as a sudden illness or health problem, there will always be someone around you who can call for help. Even running with a four-legged friend is better than running alone. In addition, dogs may be able to sense danger before you and warn you in advance. An important note is that this works only if you have a medium-sized dog. Anything smaller may not be enough to act as a deterrent.

#7. Always tell people where you are going and when you will be back.


Get into the habit of leaving short notes to loved ones or friends at the counter, in the refrigerator, or in daily text messages. Even if you live alone, having this information on hand can help keep people from worrying about when you will check-in. And if something happens, people will know when and where to come to you.

 

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